Use of HCC waste recycling centres

A Reminder to Register your vehicle for ongoing free access to Hampshire’s HWRCs

Nearly 300,000 vehicles have already registered online, ahead of the launch of a new system on 1 April 2020 by the County Council – giving Hampshire residents continued, automatic free access to Hampshire Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs).

The new system will use Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) and will ensure continued free access for residents to any of Hampshire’s 24 HWRCs to dispose of household waste. Access for non-Hampshire residents (excluding Dorset Council residents) will be for a fee of £5 per visit.

Once Hampshire residents have registered, they will see no change when they next visit a Hampshire HWRC. The system is being brought in to provide effective and environmentally practicable options for those who live close to Hampshire’s borders to continue to access the HWRCs, but in a way that is fairer to residents who pay for the cost of the service through their council tax.

Register online: https://www.hants.gov.uk/vehicle-registration-hwrc

Flood Warning

This is an update from the Environment Agency.

Flood Alert in force: Groundwater flooding in villages surrounding Andover.

Flooding is possible for: Communities at risk of groundwater flooding surrounding Andover, including Weyhill Bottom, Kimpton, Amport and Monxton.

Be prepared.

Groundwater levels are high and rising. From 13/02/2020 to 17/02/2020, 71mm of rain was recorded at Andover.  In the next few days there will be groundwater emergence into Deacon and Down Road, Kimpton. The sewage networks may be affected in all the villages. Over the next 5 days, small amounts of rain are forecast each day (except on Friday 21/02/2020, which should remain dry). The groundwater level will continue to rise for at least the next 12 days. We continue to monitor the forecast. If you use pumps to help reduce water levels, please ensure they can operate. This Flood Alert will be updated by Tuesday 25/02/2020.

To check the latest information for your area

* Visit the GOV.UK website to see the current flood warnings, view river and sea levels or check the 5-day flood risk forecast: https://flood-warning-information.service.gov.uk/target-area/065FAG003

* Or call Floodline on 0345 988 1188 using quickdial code: 216002.

 

 

Flood Warning

This is an update from the Environment Agency.  

Flood Alert in force: Groundwater flooding in villages surrounding Andover.

Communities at risk of groundwater flooding surrounding Andover, including Weyhill Bottom, Kimpton, Amport and Monxton.

Be prepared.

Groundwater levels in all the villages surrounding Andover are very high, with levels still rising slowly in response to a small amount of rainfall recorded last Sunday (02/02/2020). Until Saturday evening, the weather is dry. Storm Ciara then affects the UK. From Saturday (08/02/2020) to Monday (10/02/2020) 15mm to 30mm of rain is expected. Whilst Tuesday is currently forecast to be dry, the weather may remain unsettled later in the week. We expect groundwater levels will continue to rise over the next 7 to 10 days. This Flood Alert will be updated by Friday 14/02/2020.

 

Flood Warning

A Flood Alert has been issued by the Environment Agency.

Flood Alert in force: Possible groundwater flooding in villages surrounding Andover.

Communities at risk of groundwater flooding include Weyhill Bottom, Kimpton, Amport and Monxton.

Be prepared.

Following 6 months of above average rainfall, groundwater levels in the villages surrounding Andover are high and rising. At Clanville Gate, the current rate of rise is slow, at 0.2m per day.  Over the next 5 days the weather remains dry, but the groundwater will continue to rise over the next 10 days in response to the rainfall which was recorded last week. We continue to monitor the forecast. Please remove any valuables stored in cellars. If you use pumps to help reduce water levels, please ensure they can operate. This Flood Alert will be updated by 25/01/2020.

To check the latest information for your area–

* Visit the GOV.UK website to see the current flood warnings or check the 5-day flood risk forecast

* Or call Floodline on 0345 988 1188 using quickdial code: 216002 .

* Tune into weather, news and travel bulletins on local television and radio.

What you should consider doing now

* Monitor local water levels and weather conditions.

* Avoid walking, cycling or driving through flood water.

* Flood water is dangerous and may be polluted. Wash your hands thoroughly if you’ve been in contact with it.

 

 

Groundwater Levels

To all who may be affected by rising groundwater levels and especially to those with cellars and basements.  This is for information only and there is no need for concern at the moment  

Villages Surrounding Andover

Groundwater is average for the time of year. The level has risen by 2.4 metres in the last month. It is just stabilising. It needs to rise by a further 6.6 metres before we would be concerned about flood impacts in the communities.

This message has been issued by the Environment Agency and
contains information on the groundwater situation in your area
This information is for Areas at risk of flooding from groundwater in Hampshire.

In the last 3 months, 155% of the long term average rain has fallen in Hampshire. Groundwater has risen in all communities. As the geographic distribution of the rain has differed across the county, sites are either below, at or above long term average for the time of year. The weather outlook over the next 10 days remains unsettled, with further rain, blustery winds and showers expected. Long term forecasting is difficult, but there is some indication that this winter could be wetter than average. The extent of groundwater flood impacts (if any) is now dependant on the weather over the next 5 months. However, with average rainfall throughout this time, it is not unrealistic to expect groundwater flooding in some communities this season. We will update this Briefing Note by Friday 17th January 2020.

The attached briefing note provides further information on the current groundwater situation and the forecast risk of flooding.  It also gives you advice on actions you can take.

Keep an eye on local water levels and weather conditions.  Visit the GOV.UK website for groundwater levels and flooding information.

·         Call Floodline on 0345 988 1188 for up-to-date flooding information.

Customer service line   03708 506 506    www.environment-agency.gov.uk    Incident hotline0800 80 70 60

Septic Tanks Rule Change for 2020

Septic tank regulations. It’s not an opening phrase that would make many people read on, but if your property has a septic tank – or if you are buying a property with a septic tank, you might need to.

All of Monxton appears to be in the red zone, so any this will affect any septic tank owners in the village.

Given what goes into a septic tank, it’s understandable why the Environment Agency is keen to make sure that it stays in the tank, instead of floating down the local stream. So, there are a lot of rules and regulations surrounding septic tanks – from where you can put them, to where the water that leaves the tank can go. Some are best practice guidelines, but others are legislation, and you could find yourself in the equivalent of the contents of your septic tank if you ignore them.

The latest regulations came out in 2015, and are called ‘General binding rules: small sewage discharge to a surface water’. It doesn’t exactly trip off the tongue, but its a very important document for many property owners.

Once upon a time, you could ‘discharge’ the separated waste water from within the septic tank through one of two ways:

  1. To a drainage field or soakaway system – here, the waste water percolates through holes or slots into the pipework, into the surrounding sub-soils. This provides a form of treatment of the water, and it allows the waste water to disperse safely without causing a pollution.
  2. To a watercourse – the waste water would flow through a sealed pipe straight to a local watercourse such as a stream or a river.

So, what’s changed?

You are no longer allowed to discharge from a septic tank to a watercourse, or to any other type of soakaway system other than a drainage field. The reason for this is because the ‘quality’ of the waste water is no longer considered clean enough to flow straight into local watercourses or soakaway systems without causing pollution.

Now, this isn’t an entirely new rule. For some years now, property owners have not been allowed to install a new septic tank which discharges to a watercourse. However, if your property already had a septic tank discharging to a watercourse, unless the EA identified that it was causing a pollution, you were able to carry on.

This all changes in 2020. If your property’s septic tank discharges to a watercourse, not a soakaway or drainage field, you must replace or upgrade the system by 1st January 2020 – or before that date if you are selling your property.

What are the options?

There are two main ways in which you can comply with the new regulations:

  1. Swap your septic tank for a sewage treatment plant – sewage treatment plants produce a cleaner form of water, and it’s considered clean enough to discharge straight to a watercourse
  2. Install a drainage field or soakaway system – this will take the waste water from your septic tank, and disperse it safely into the ground without causing pollution.

It’s not all doom and gloom, there’s still plenty of time to make the switch. And let’s face it, no one wants to think about the inhabitants of the local streams or rivers hanging out in the dirty water from septic tanks, so it’s a positive change for the environment.

In order to help simplify things, read this Quick Guide to Septic Tank, Sewage Treatment Plant and Cesspit Regulations which you can download now here.

https://www.gov.uk/permits-you-need-for-septic-tanks/general-binding-rules

 

 

If You See An Injured Deer By The Road…

IF YOU SEE AN INJURED DEER ON THE ROADSIDE

  • Pull over at the next safe place.
  • Call the Police. They will deal with road safety issues and have access to a specialist who will know the best course of action for the animal if it is alive.

IF YOU HIT A DEER WHILE DRIVING, YOUR PRIORITIES, IN
THIS ORDER, ARE:

  • Keep yourself and anyone with you as safe as you can.
  • Park your car in the safest place with hazard lights on.
  • Consider using it to also warn other road users.
  • Call an ambulance if human injuries warrant it.
  • Call the Police.

Usually it is best:

  • Not to approach live deer. Doing so may cause them to run across traffic causing another accident.
  • Not to move or handle live deer, you may be injured if they struggle.
  • Not to try to keep the deer warm. Covering its head/eyes may keep it calmer if there is a long wait but see “approach live deer” above.

www.deeraware.com