Public Fireworks Displays

Stay safe this bonfire night by taking your family to one of the organised bonfire and firework displays in our area.

Andover Golf Club

Saturday 3rd November
5pm – 10pm Gates open at 5pm, fireworks at 7pm
Tickets £20 for a family, under 5’s go free.
Hot food, drinks, bouncy castle and fireworks

Bulbery Playing Field, Abbotts Ann, SP11 7BN

Sunday 4th November, 5.30pm -7.45pm
This year’s village fireworks and bonfire night, organised jointly by the Abbotts Ann School PTA and the Friends of Bulbery Sports Field, will take place on Sunday 4th November. Tickets available from the village shop, Eagle Inn or the school office. Family ticket = £18 (£23 on the night), adult ticket = £6 (£8 on the night), child (3-U16yrs) ticket £4 (£5 on the night).

The Sports Field, Buckholt Road, Broughton, Stockbridge, SO20 8DA

Monday 5th November
Adult £6 / Child £5
Broughton Firework Club’s amazing annual firework display will once again take place on Bonfire Night 5th November 2018.  There will be a Torch Lit Procession at 6:30pm from The Square (outside The Greyhound Pub) up to the sports field in Buckholt Road. The bonfire will be lit around 7pm and the firework display will begin around 7:30pm.  Hot food and refreshments will be available.  Follow event signs for free parking adjacent to the cemetery on Salisbury Road.  Tickets can be bought on the night.

Fireworks and the law

The law states you must not set off or throw fireworks (including sparklers) in the street or other public places.You must not set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am.

The exceptions are:

  • Bonfire Night, when the cut off is midnight
  • New Year’s Eve cut off is 1am

Bonfire Night

Statistically, homes with thatched roofs are no more likely to catch fire than those with conventional roofs; however, if a thatched roof does ignite, the results are rapid and devastating.  We would ask that residents do not have bonfires or set off any fireworks in their gardens, as they pose a serious risk to the thatched properties in the village. If you live under thatch, it is wise to be extra vigilant around November 5th and make frequent checks on your roof.  Chinese lanterns are of particular concern, as the potential for harm when they descend is catastrophic, with a number of thatch fires resulting from these lanterns. 

For further information and advice, contact your local fire safety officer.

The laws concerning fireworks

  • It is illegal for anyone under 18 to possess a firework in a public place.
  • Fireworks cannot be set off by a private individual between 11.00pm and 7.00am except for certain nights of the year.
  • It is an offence to cause any unnecessary suffering to any captive or domestic animal.

Fireworks and Animals

Recommendations from the Blue Cross:
Every year thousands of animals will suffer as a result of fireworks being let off. Blue Cross animal hospitals across the country see a marked rise in pets requiring medication during such stressful times, and many animals are brought into Blue Cross adoption centres having run away from home.

Animals have very acute hearing. Loud bangs and whistles may cause actual pain in their ears. But by following these simple guidelines your pet need not suffer.

Small pets
Rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, gerbils, mice, ferrets and birds all need to be treated with special care when fireworks are being let off. These animals are easily frightened. The Blue Cross advises that owners of such types of small animal should follow these precautions:

  • Hutches/cages and enclosures should, if possible, be brought into a quiet room indoors, or into a garage or shed.
  • Give your pet extra bedding to burrow into so it feels safe.
  • If you cannot bring your pet’s hutch inside, you should turn its enclosure around so that it faces a wall or fence instead of the open garden.
  • Cover any aviaries or hutches with thick blankets or a duvet to block out the sight of the fireworks and deaden the sound of the bangs, but make sure there is enough ventilation.

Dogs & cats

  • Always keep dogs and cats inside when fireworks are being let off.
  • Make sure your dog is walked earlier in the day before the fireworks start.
  • Close all windows and doors, and block off catflaps to stop pets escaping and to keep noise to a minimum. Draw the curtains, and if the animals are used to the sounds of TV or radio, switch them on (but not too loudly) in order to block out some of the noise of the fireworks.
  • Ensure dogs are wearing some form of easily readable identification (ID) – even in the house. They should have at least a collar and tag.
  • Think about fitting pets with a microchip, so that if they do run away they have a better chance of being quickly reunited with you.
  • Prepare a ‘den’ for your pet where it can feel safe and comfortable – perhaps under a bed with some of your old clothes. It may like to hide there when the fireworks start.
  • Let your pet pace around, whine, miaow and hide in a corner if it wants to. Do not try to coax it out – it’s just trying to find safety, so don’t disturb it.
  • Try not to cuddle and comfort distressed pets as they will think you are worried too, and this may make the problem worse. Instead stay relaxed, act normally and praise calm behaviour.
  • Avoid leaving your pet alone during such potentially upsetting events. If you do have to leave the house, don’t get angry with your pet if you find it has been destructive after being left on its own. Shouting at a frightened pet will only make it more stressed.
  • Don’t tie your dog up outside while fireworks are being let off, ie outside a shop while you pop inside, or leave it in the garden or in your car.
  • Never take your dog to a fireworks display.

Horses & ponies

  • Fireworks must not be set off near livestock or horses in fields, or close to buildings housing livestock. Anyone planning a firework display in a rural area should warn neighbouring farmers in advance.
  • Try to make sure that fireworks are never set off near your horse’s field or stable. Tell neighbours and local fireworks display organisers there are horses nearby, so that they can ensure fireworks are set off in the opposite direction and well away from them.
  • Keep your horse in its familiar environment, in its normal routine with any companions to make it feel secure. If your horse is usually stabled then keep it stabled. If it is normally out in the field, keep it there as long as it is safe, secure and not near the fireworks display area.
  • Ensure that you or someone experienced stays with your horse if you know fireworks are being set off. This way you can observe its behaviour, ensure it remains as safe and calm as possible and respond to its reactions appropriately.
  • If you know your horse reacts badly to loud noises speak to your vet or perhaps consider moving your horse for the night.
  • Try to remain calm and positive as horses can sense unease in a person and this might make things worse if the horse is startled.
  • Be careful yourself. Try not to get in the way if your horse becomes startled as you may get hurt.
  • Chinese lanterns are known to cause terrible injuries and the deaths of horses and other livestock. As there is no way of controlling where they go and where they land, the advice to horse owners is to be vigilant and to ensure you check your fields and hedgerows for these lanterns.

Asian Hornets

Conservation alert:

Asian Hornets (Vespa Velutina) were found this summer in New Alresford and Brockenhurst. It pays to be observant and aware of this species. There are many good websites with information about what they look like and what to do if you find one for example at http://www.nonnativespecies.org/alerts/index.cfm?id=4.

If you see one this Autumn (or next Summer) report it straight away to alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk.   Information about a new app can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-app-to-report-asian-hornet-sightings

Watercress & Winterbournes – 6 August

pillhill comic poster

The event is on Monday 6th August at 7pm, meeting at Abbotts Ann Village shop. Numbers are limited and booking is essential.

The objective is for me to generate awareness and also to recruit some interested people onto the Pillhill Brook Community Catchment Group (CCG). This CCG would decide the projects to be written into our Heritage Lottery Bid, which if it is successful, will release the 5 years’ worth of funding.

 

Fly Tipping

Fly-tipping is the illegal dumping of waste and is a criminal offence.

Examples of fly-tipping include:

  • dumping waste on land where there is no waste management licence, including public highways
  • leaving rubbish or waste outside household waste recycling centres
  • giving your waste to someone else to fly-tip
  • allowing waste to be dumped on your own property

The Police and local authorities take action against any householder or business who illegally disposes of their waste, or who does not ensure that their waste is collected by a registered waste service firm.

You are legally responsible for any household waste produced on your property or where you live. This responsibility is called your “duty of care”.

You face an unlimited fine if your waste ends up fly-tipped and you cannot show that you took reasonable steps to prevent it.

       Report fly-tipping to Test Valley Borough Council on 01264 368000

 

Footpath Representative Required

Image result for footpath signDo you walk around Monxton regularly? If so, Monxton needs a new Footpath Representative, to ensure all our byways and paths are kept in good condition for us all to enjoy.

The role involves keeping an eye on all the paths in the parish (maps are available) and liaising with the parish lengthsman on keeping the paths cut and well maintained.

Reports on the paths need to be given quarterly to Monxton Parish Council at the meetings, although this can also be a written report if you’re unable to attend each time.

So if you enjoy walking around our beautiful parish please get in touch – monxtonmatters@gmail.com