Groundwater Levels

To all who may be affected by rising groundwater levels and especially to those with cellars and basements.  This is for information only and there is no need for concern at the moment  

Villages Surrounding Andover

Groundwater is average for the time of year. The level has risen by 2.4 metres in the last month. It is just stabilising. It needs to rise by a further 6.6 metres before we would be concerned about flood impacts in the communities.

This message has been issued by the Environment Agency and
contains information on the groundwater situation in your area
This information is for Areas at risk of flooding from groundwater in Hampshire.

In the last 3 months, 155% of the long term average rain has fallen in Hampshire. Groundwater has risen in all communities. As the geographic distribution of the rain has differed across the county, sites are either below, at or above long term average for the time of year. The weather outlook over the next 10 days remains unsettled, with further rain, blustery winds and showers expected. Long term forecasting is difficult, but there is some indication that this winter could be wetter than average. The extent of groundwater flood impacts (if any) is now dependant on the weather over the next 5 months. However, with average rainfall throughout this time, it is not unrealistic to expect groundwater flooding in some communities this season. We will update this Briefing Note by Friday 17th January 2020.

The attached briefing note provides further information on the current groundwater situation and the forecast risk of flooding.  It also gives you advice on actions you can take.

Keep an eye on local water levels and weather conditions.  Visit the GOV.UK website for groundwater levels and flooding information.

·         Call Floodline on 0345 988 1188 for up-to-date flooding information.

Customer service line   03708 506 506    www.environment-agency.gov.uk    Incident hotline0800 80 70 60

Amport PTA Quiz: February 7th 2020

Amport PTA Quiz Night – Friday 7th February

The annual Amport School PTA Quiz night is taking place on Friday 7th February in the Monxton Village Hall, from 7.30pm to 11pm.

Tickets are £12.50 and as always they include a delicious meal, a mind-puzzling and fun quiz and a great raffle. Plus there’s a pay bar all night.

You can either organise a table of 8 people, or we can help put one together for you.

A brilliant evening and school fundraiser, please book your tickets now by emailing annaduvoisin@gmail.com 

Village Hall Treasurer

Could you be the next Treasurer for the Monxton & Amport Village Hall?

The Monxton & Amport Village Hall Committee is looking to recruit a valuable new member of the team who will take care of the treasury responsibilities such as record keeping, paying bills and ensuring the income is banked. Other duties include governance of the hall, arranging routine maintenance and servicing, ensuring the hall is legal (insurance, licences, electrics, etc), attending committee meetings, and also being a key holder for the building.

Be part of the team that takes the village hall into the future. There are exciting times ahead! Contact Committee Chair, Penny Kitson on penny@kitsonsonline.co.uk

 

Public Firework Displays

Stay safe this bonfire night by taking your family to one of the organised bonfire and firework displays in our area.

Andover New Street Football Club Bonfire Night 2019
Saturday 2nd November at the club.

  • ALL Welcome – Gates open at 6.00 p.m.
  • Hot food & drinks available !!  Sweet stall !!
  • Licensed bar
  • Entrance £5.00 per person (Under 5’s FREE)
  • Location: Foxcotte Lane, Andover, SP11 0TA

Abbotts Ann School Fireworks 2019
Saturday 2nd November 2019.

  • Location: Abbotts Ann School, Abbotts Ann

Andover Golf Club Fireworks Night 2019
Saturday 2nd November 2019

  • Gates Open 5pm
  • Fireworks 7pm
  • Tickets £6 per person
  • £20 for a family of 4
  • Under 5’s FREE

Rookwood School Fireworks 2019
Friday 8th November 2019.

  • Tickets available from Kenyons.
  • Food, drink and activities from about 5.30pm
  • Location: Rookwood School, Weyhill Road, Andover, SP10 3AL

 

 

Bonfire Night

Statistically, homes with thatched roofs are no more likely to catch fire than those with conventional roofs; however, if a thatched roof does ignite, the results are rapid and devastating.  We would ask that residents do not have bonfires or set off any fireworks in their gardens, as they pose a serious risk to the thatched properties in the village. If you live under thatch, it is wise to be extra vigilant around November 5th and make frequent checks on your roof.  Chinese lanterns are of particular concern, as the potential for harm when they descend is catastrophic, with a number of thatch fires resulting from these lanterns. 

For further information and advice, contact your local fire safety officer.

The laws concerning fireworks

  • It is illegal for anyone under 18 to possess a firework in a public place.
  • Fireworks cannot be set off by a private individual between 11.00pm and 7.00am except for certain nights of the year.
  • It is an offence to cause any unnecessary suffering to any captive or domestic animal.

Fireworks and Animals

Recommendations from the Blue Cross:
Every year thousands of animals will suffer as a result of fireworks being let off. Blue Cross animal hospitals across the country see a marked rise in pets requiring medication during such stressful times, and many animals are brought into Blue Cross adoption centres having run away from home.

Animals have very acute hearing. Loud bangs and whistles may cause actual pain in their ears. But by following these simple guidelines your pet need not suffer.

Small pets
Rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, gerbils, mice, ferrets and birds all need to be treated with special care when fireworks are being let off. These animals are easily frightened. The Blue Cross advises that owners of such types of small animal should follow these precautions:

  • Hutches/cages and enclosures should, if possible, be brought into a quiet room indoors, or into a garage or shed.
  • Give your pet extra bedding to burrow into so it feels safe.
  • If you cannot bring your pet’s hutch inside, you should turn its enclosure around so that it faces a wall or fence instead of the open garden.
  • Cover any aviaries or hutches with thick blankets or a duvet to block out the sight of the fireworks and deaden the sound of the bangs, but make sure there is enough ventilation.

Dogs & cats

  • Always keep dogs and cats inside when fireworks are being let off.
  • Make sure your dog is walked earlier in the day before the fireworks start.
  • Close all windows and doors, and block off catflaps to stop pets escaping and to keep noise to a minimum. Draw the curtains, and if the animals are used to the sounds of TV or radio, switch them on (but not too loudly) in order to block out some of the noise of the fireworks.
  • Ensure dogs are wearing some form of easily readable identification (ID) – even in the house. They should have at least a collar and tag.
  • Think about fitting pets with a microchip, so that if they do run away they have a better chance of being quickly reunited with you.
  • Prepare a ‘den’ for your pet where it can feel safe and comfortable – perhaps under a bed with some of your old clothes. It may like to hide there when the fireworks start.
  • Let your pet pace around, whine, miaow and hide in a corner if it wants to. Do not try to coax it out – it’s just trying to find safety, so don’t disturb it.
  • Try not to cuddle and comfort distressed pets as they will think you are worried too, and this may make the problem worse. Instead stay relaxed, act normally and praise calm behaviour.
  • Avoid leaving your pet alone during such potentially upsetting events. If you do have to leave the house, don’t get angry with your pet if you find it has been destructive after being left on its own. Shouting at a frightened pet will only make it more stressed.
  • Don’t tie your dog up outside while fireworks are being let off, ie outside a shop while you pop inside, or leave it in the garden or in your car.
  • Never take your dog to a fireworks display.

Horses & ponies

  • Fireworks must not be set off near livestock or horses in fields, or close to buildings housing livestock. Anyone planning a firework display in a rural area should warn neighbouring farmers in advance.
  • Try to make sure that fireworks are never set off near your horse’s field or stable. Tell neighbours and local fireworks display organisers there are horses nearby, so that they can ensure fireworks are set off in the opposite direction and well away from them.
  • Keep your horse in its familiar environment, in its normal routine with any companions to make it feel secure. If your horse is usually stabled then keep it stabled. If it is normally out in the field, keep it there as long as it is safe, secure and not near the fireworks display area.
  • Ensure that you or someone experienced stays with your horse if you know fireworks are being set off. This way you can observe its behaviour, ensure it remains as safe and calm as possible and respond to its reactions appropriately.
  • If you know your horse reacts badly to loud noises speak to your vet or perhaps consider moving your horse for the night.
  • Try to remain calm and positive as horses can sense unease in a person and this might make things worse if the horse is startled.
  • Be careful yourself. Try not to get in the way if your horse becomes startled as you may get hurt.

Chinese lanterns are known to cause terrible injuries and the deaths of horses and other livestock. As there is no way of controlling where they go and where they land, the advice to horse owners is to be vigilant and to ensure you check your fields and hedgerows for these lanterns.

Septic Tanks Rule Change for 2020

Septic tank regulations. It’s not an opening phrase that would make many people read on, but if your property has a septic tank – or if you are buying a property with a septic tank, you might need to.

All of Monxton appears to be in the red zone, so any this will affect any septic tank owners in the village.

Given what goes into a septic tank, it’s understandable why the Environment Agency is keen to make sure that it stays in the tank, instead of floating down the local stream. So, there are a lot of rules and regulations surrounding septic tanks – from where you can put them, to where the water that leaves the tank can go. Some are best practice guidelines, but others are legislation, and you could find yourself in the equivalent of the contents of your septic tank if you ignore them.

The latest regulations came out in 2015, and are called ‘General binding rules: small sewage discharge to a surface water’. It doesn’t exactly trip off the tongue, but its a very important document for many property owners.

Once upon a time, you could ‘discharge’ the separated waste water from within the septic tank through one of two ways:

  1. To a drainage field or soakaway system – here, the waste water percolates through holes or slots into the pipework, into the surrounding sub-soils. This provides a form of treatment of the water, and it allows the waste water to disperse safely without causing a pollution.
  2. To a watercourse – the waste water would flow through a sealed pipe straight to a local watercourse such as a stream or a river.

So, what’s changed?

You are no longer allowed to discharge from a septic tank to a watercourse, or to any other type of soakaway system other than a drainage field. The reason for this is because the ‘quality’ of the waste water is no longer considered clean enough to flow straight into local watercourses or soakaway systems without causing pollution.

Now, this isn’t an entirely new rule. For some years now, property owners have not been allowed to install a new septic tank which discharges to a watercourse. However, if your property already had a septic tank discharging to a watercourse, unless the EA identified that it was causing a pollution, you were able to carry on.

This all changes in 2020. If your property’s septic tank discharges to a watercourse, not a soakaway or drainage field, you must replace or upgrade the system by 1st January 2020 – or before that date if you are selling your property.

What are the options?

There are two main ways in which you can comply with the new regulations:

  1. Swap your septic tank for a sewage treatment plant – sewage treatment plants produce a cleaner form of water, and it’s considered clean enough to discharge straight to a watercourse
  2. Install a drainage field or soakaway system – this will take the waste water from your septic tank, and disperse it safely into the ground without causing pollution.

It’s not all doom and gloom, there’s still plenty of time to make the switch. And let’s face it, no one wants to think about the inhabitants of the local streams or rivers hanging out in the dirty water from septic tanks, so it’s a positive change for the environment.

In order to help simplify things, read this Quick Guide to Septic Tank, Sewage Treatment Plant and Cesspit Regulations which you can download now here.

https://www.gov.uk/permits-you-need-for-septic-tanks/general-binding-rules