Harvest Celebration: Blackberry Jams & Raffle Prize

Autumn Harvest Celebration

Please take the time to visit Windermere House, Chalkpit Lane on Sunday 20th September between 12 noon to 3pm where you will find a range of fresh local produce as well as superb home-made Blackberry & Gin Jam.  All proceeds raised will go to Monxton Church and the Village Hall.  Price: £3.50 per jar or 3 jars for £10.

 

 

 


Win a Hamper

Raffle Hamper

There will also be a raffle to win a fabulous hamper, kindly donated by Rosebourne in Weyhill. Tickets are just £1 and the draw will take place at 3pm.

 

Home Made Preserves: Sunday 20th

Jean Wood ‘s home-made preserves have traditionally been sold at the Open Garden Teas at the August Bank Holiday to raise funds for Monxton Church. As this could not happen this year home-made preserves, marmalades, jams and jellies will be sold in the drive of Fourways Cottage (at the crossroads), by kind permission of Mr & Mrs McCausland on Sunday, September 20th from 12 noon until 3pm as part of the Autumn Harvest Celebration.

Apple Treats: Sunday 20th September

Home Made Apple Butter and Monxton Apple Juice

These two delicious treats will be for sale at Lodwick, on the corner of High Street and Chalk Pit Lane on Sunday 20th September, 12 noon to 3pm, as part of the Covid-compliant, socially-distanced Autumn Harvest Celebration.

Apple Butter is made of apples, a little sugar, a squeeze of lemon, cinnamon and cardamom, then roasted long, low and slow (around 7 hours at 140°c) until they are concentrated and the consistency of butter.  Truly delicious on hot, buttered toast or with cheese.  Nicola Dunning has been making Apple Butter for a month now, selling it to raise funds for the Mama Paulina School of Hope in Kenya.  £800 raised so far, the aim is to reach £1,000.  Price: just £5 per jar.

Our Monxton Apple Juice, has been pressed and bottled especially for this event by Kimpton Apple Press.  Price: £3.50 per bottle or 3 bottles for only £10.  All profits to go to Monxton Church and Village Hall.  It is delicious!

It’s been a bumper year for apples!

Amport PTA Quiz: February 7th 2020

Amport PTA Quiz Night – Friday 7th February

The annual Amport School PTA Quiz night is taking place on Friday 7th February in the Monxton Village Hall, from 7.30pm to 11pm.

Tickets are £12.50 and as always they include a delicious meal, a mind-puzzling and fun quiz and a great raffle. Plus there’s a pay bar all night.

You can either organise a table of 8 people, or we can help put one together for you.

A brilliant evening and school fundraiser, please book your tickets now by emailing annaduvoisin@gmail.com 

Public Firework Displays

Stay safe this bonfire night by taking your family to one of the organised bonfire and firework displays in our area.

Andover New Street Football Club Bonfire Night 2019
Saturday 2nd November at the club.

  • ALL Welcome – Gates open at 6.00 p.m.
  • Hot food & drinks available !!  Sweet stall !!
  • Licensed bar
  • Entrance £5.00 per person (Under 5’s FREE)
  • Location: Foxcotte Lane, Andover, SP11 0TA

Abbotts Ann School Fireworks 2019
Saturday 2nd November 2019.

  • Location: Abbotts Ann School, Abbotts Ann

Andover Golf Club Fireworks Night 2019
Saturday 2nd November 2019

  • Gates Open 5pm
  • Fireworks 7pm
  • Tickets £6 per person
  • £20 for a family of 4
  • Under 5’s FREE

Rookwood School Fireworks 2019
Friday 8th November 2019.

  • Tickets available from Kenyons.
  • Food, drink and activities from about 5.30pm
  • Location: Rookwood School, Weyhill Road, Andover, SP10 3AL

 

 

Bonfire Night

Statistically, homes with thatched roofs are no more likely to catch fire than those with conventional roofs; however, if a thatched roof does ignite, the results are rapid and devastating.  We would ask that residents do not have bonfires or set off any fireworks in their gardens, as they pose a serious risk to the thatched properties in the village. If you live under thatch, it is wise to be extra vigilant around November 5th and make frequent checks on your roof.  Chinese lanterns are of particular concern, as the potential for harm when they descend is catastrophic, with a number of thatch fires resulting from these lanterns. 

For further information and advice, contact your local fire safety officer.

The laws concerning fireworks

  • It is illegal for anyone under 18 to possess a firework in a public place.
  • Fireworks cannot be set off by a private individual between 11.00pm and 7.00am except for certain nights of the year.
  • It is an offence to cause any unnecessary suffering to any captive or domestic animal.

Fireworks and Animals

Recommendations from the Blue Cross:
Every year thousands of animals will suffer as a result of fireworks being let off. Blue Cross animal hospitals across the country see a marked rise in pets requiring medication during such stressful times, and many animals are brought into Blue Cross adoption centres having run away from home.

Animals have very acute hearing. Loud bangs and whistles may cause actual pain in their ears. But by following these simple guidelines your pet need not suffer.

Small pets
Rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, gerbils, mice, ferrets and birds all need to be treated with special care when fireworks are being let off. These animals are easily frightened. The Blue Cross advises that owners of such types of small animal should follow these precautions:

  • Hutches/cages and enclosures should, if possible, be brought into a quiet room indoors, or into a garage or shed.
  • Give your pet extra bedding to burrow into so it feels safe.
  • If you cannot bring your pet’s hutch inside, you should turn its enclosure around so that it faces a wall or fence instead of the open garden.
  • Cover any aviaries or hutches with thick blankets or a duvet to block out the sight of the fireworks and deaden the sound of the bangs, but make sure there is enough ventilation.

Dogs & cats

  • Always keep dogs and cats inside when fireworks are being let off.
  • Make sure your dog is walked earlier in the day before the fireworks start.
  • Close all windows and doors, and block off catflaps to stop pets escaping and to keep noise to a minimum. Draw the curtains, and if the animals are used to the sounds of TV or radio, switch them on (but not too loudly) in order to block out some of the noise of the fireworks.
  • Ensure dogs are wearing some form of easily readable identification (ID) – even in the house. They should have at least a collar and tag.
  • Think about fitting pets with a microchip, so that if they do run away they have a better chance of being quickly reunited with you.
  • Prepare a ‘den’ for your pet where it can feel safe and comfortable – perhaps under a bed with some of your old clothes. It may like to hide there when the fireworks start.
  • Let your pet pace around, whine, miaow and hide in a corner if it wants to. Do not try to coax it out – it’s just trying to find safety, so don’t disturb it.
  • Try not to cuddle and comfort distressed pets as they will think you are worried too, and this may make the problem worse. Instead stay relaxed, act normally and praise calm behaviour.
  • Avoid leaving your pet alone during such potentially upsetting events. If you do have to leave the house, don’t get angry with your pet if you find it has been destructive after being left on its own. Shouting at a frightened pet will only make it more stressed.
  • Don’t tie your dog up outside while fireworks are being let off, ie outside a shop while you pop inside, or leave it in the garden or in your car.
  • Never take your dog to a fireworks display.

Horses & ponies

  • Fireworks must not be set off near livestock or horses in fields, or close to buildings housing livestock. Anyone planning a firework display in a rural area should warn neighbouring farmers in advance.
  • Try to make sure that fireworks are never set off near your horse’s field or stable. Tell neighbours and local fireworks display organisers there are horses nearby, so that they can ensure fireworks are set off in the opposite direction and well away from them.
  • Keep your horse in its familiar environment, in its normal routine with any companions to make it feel secure. If your horse is usually stabled then keep it stabled. If it is normally out in the field, keep it there as long as it is safe, secure and not near the fireworks display area.
  • Ensure that you or someone experienced stays with your horse if you know fireworks are being set off. This way you can observe its behaviour, ensure it remains as safe and calm as possible and respond to its reactions appropriately.
  • If you know your horse reacts badly to loud noises speak to your vet or perhaps consider moving your horse for the night.
  • Try to remain calm and positive as horses can sense unease in a person and this might make things worse if the horse is startled.
  • Be careful yourself. Try not to get in the way if your horse becomes startled as you may get hurt.

Chinese lanterns are known to cause terrible injuries and the deaths of horses and other livestock. As there is no way of controlling where they go and where they land, the advice to horse owners is to be vigilant and to ensure you check your fields and hedgerows for these lanterns.